Royal Mail stamp set is completed with the Manchester Town Hall

The Royal Mail’s 26-stamp, alphabetical journey around the UK concludes with the second part (M-Z) of its UK A-Z series and the launch of 14 new stamps, featuring iconic landmarks across all four countries. UK A-Z Part 2, issued on 10th April, celebrates some of the UK’s most famous tourist attractions. They range from the impressive Narrow Water Castle in Northern Ireland and the dramatic Urquhart castle in Scotland to the beautiful Portmeirion in Wales and our own Manchester Town Hall.

The First Class Manchester Town Hall

A-Z UK Part 2 ManchesterManchester Town Hall was designed and built in 1877 by Alfred Waterhouse, and is the headquarters of Manchester City Council.

The original Manchester Town Hall was constructed between 1822-1825, but was quickly outgrown as Manchester enjoyed the boom years of its local textile industry.

Planning for a new town hall began in 1863, when the Manchester Corporation demanded a building ‘equal if not superior, to any similar building in the country at any cost, which may be reasonably required’. They were presented with a building in 1877 that is regarded to this day as one of the finest interpretations of neo-gothic architecture in the United Kingdom.

The town hall was granted Grade I Listed status in 1952.

Royal Mail has kindly let me offer you a complete set of the new set of 14 stamps of the UK A-Z Part 2 completely free.

Unfortunately there’s a small number of sets available.

To make this as fair as possible leave a comment here and I’ll put all comments into a draw. I’ll then ask the winners to email me their addresses and I’ll send off their set.

Happy commenting!

About Jim Symcox

Manchester is great. At Manchester University I take part in Gilbert & Sullivan productions each year. I'm a Manchester-based business growth coach and marketing evangelist and like to help companies grow more profitable, more quickly.
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